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Triton Saves Time and Money With e-Cash Management

Tuesday 24 May 2005 14:18 CET | News

When companies need to forecast their cash flow, they don’t want to wait around. They want instant gratification: immediate access to real-time, interactive models. Triton Consulting, of the United Kingdom, turned to Cash Gauge Software for more effective cash flow forecasts.

That meant the ability to: move payment or invoice information to new dates by dragging and dropping; recalculate cash flow forecasts on a daily, weekly or monthly basis, without having to change, re-key or save data; and import cash flow data from existing Excel spreadsheets. Gaining Business Insight Employing a company’s current accounts receivable and accounts payable invoice data, Cash Gauge is optimized for the generation and analysis of detailed, up-to-date cash projections. The software places each invoice into a forecasted payment date column, calculated using either the invoice due date or a projected days-to-pay that can vary by customer and vendor. Using “drag and drop” functionality, data can be moved from one projected column to another to reflect current payment assumptions. Once realistic cash forecasts are prepared, colorful graphs can be displayed or printed in Cash Gauge to help management see its upcoming cash flow. Reports can also be produced with the detail to support those graphs, and the reports can be exported to Microsoft Excel for easy distribution to co-workers and lenders. Cash Gauge supports an unlimited number of forecast models so clients can easily produce more pessimistic or optimistic scenarios. This flexibility and drag and drop functionality is a far cry from the Excel spreadsheets Triton previously used. An IT consultancy, Triton had developed fairly sophisticated spreadsheets for its cash forecasts. However, these spreadsheets made it difficult to move invoices across expected payment dates, which is essential to avoid time-consuming data-entry. What’s more, there was no way to change the length or granularity of the forecasting period. Bottom line, cash management was becoming too burdensome using this method. Triton evaluated other products before settling on Cash Gauge, but the problem with all of them was that their price didn’t represent value relative to Triton’s needs, or they were too basic in their functionality. For example, some vendors only offered expensive multi-user licenses. Other software, available for a free download trial, was far more affordable, but proved to be little more than basic cash models that lacked the flexibility Triton required. And the ‘cash flow forecast’ facility provided by Triton’s accounts receivables vendor was inadequate for the company’s needs: expense data had to be generated from averages of preceding transactions (not useful to Triton) or input manually (also of little interest).


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Categories: Payments & Commerce | Payments General
Countries: World
This article is part of category

Payments & Commerce