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Barclays and Hitachi launch finger vein scanner

Thursday 21 November 2019 14:30 CET | News

Barclays has unveiled its enhanced finger vein scanner, which will help businesses access their banking facilities in seconds.

The Barclays Biometric Reader (BBR), developed in collaboration with Hitachi, uses infra-red technology to identify the user by scanning their unique finger vein patterns. Even more secure than a fingerprint, this initiative removes the need to remember PINs or passwords and eliminates the risk of PIN capture, identity fraud or sharing of account details.

The new device improves on the first version by introducing a ‘Sign What You See’ (SWYS) activity screen which provides a further safeguard against fraud. The screen displays written instructions to the user describing the activity being authorised, offering an additional layer of security in case their computer was compromised and a fraudster had manipulated the details of the activity needing authorisation. Another key development is Bluetooth wireless connectivity, making it easier for users to manage their banking without having to physically connect the scanner to their computer.

The technology behind the finger vein scanner is Hitachi’s VeinID. There is no public record of the user’s vein pattern and Barclays does not hold the vein pattern on their systems. Barclays’ digital banking system iPortal, which provides a single access point and sign-in for all services, has been designed to fully interact with the BBR, making the account management and payments process seamless for the end user.

The new device will be available to Corporate Banking and Business Banking clients who use the bank’s Barclays.Net and iPortal digital channels from early 2020.


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Keywords: Barclays, Hitachi, vein scanner, security, fraud, biometrics, banking, payments
Categories: Banking & Fintech | Digital Identity, Security & Online Fraud
Countries: United Kingdom
This article is part of category

Banking & Fintech